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AP 303

Reporting Student Achievement

Background 


This procedure sets out the provisions for reporting student progress and is based on ministerial orders and regulations authorized under the School Act. It outlines requirements for formal and informal reporting, as well as the responsibilities of the principal and teachers, for the implementation of this procedure. 

Procedures 


1. Reporting Student Achievement

1.1 Parents/guardians must be provided a minimum of five (5) reports per year of which at least three (3) must be formal. The remaining two (2) reports are informal reports. In grades 9 through 12, letter grades must be recorded on the report form. 

1.2 Informal reports are issued a minimum of two times per year. In relation to curriculum, informal reports may describe:
• What the student is able to do 
• The areas of learning that require further attention or development 
• Ways the teacher is supporting the student’s learning needs (and, where appropriate, ways the student or the parents might support the learning) 

  • 1.2.1 Informal reports are an important link between home and school and can take a variety of forms, such as:
    • Telephone calls
    • Interim reports (written or oral) 
    • Conferences (parent-teacher, three-way, student-led, etc.)   
  • 1.2.2 Parents should have the opportunity to meet with teachers for a conference at least once each school year. A record of each informal report should be kept, noting the date, and type and topic(s) of discussion. 
  • 1.2.3 In grades 9-12 a district approved digital gradebook is used to communicate student progress. A meeting with the teacher is not required.

1.3 Formal Written Reports are issued a minimum of three times per year on a district-approved form, following the requirements for specific grades and programs as stated in provincial legislation. These reports include student attendance records and must be completed according to the following specific guidelines:

  • 1.3.1 Primary Reports (Kindergarten through Grade 3)
    • Include a structured written report that clearly describes, in relation to the expected learning standards set out in the curricula what the student is able to do, areas in which the student requires further attention or development, and ways of supporting the student in his or her learning.
    • Provide a written statement about student progress with reference to the expected development for students in a similar age range or grade. 
    • Include written comments to describe student behavior, including information on attitudes, work habits, and effort.  
  • 1.3.2 Intermediate Reports (Grades 4 to 8)
    • Include a structured written report that clearly describes, in relation to the expected learning standards set out in the curricula: what the student is able to do, areas in which the student requires further attention or development, and ways of supporting the student in his or her learning. 
    • Include written comments to describe student behavior, including information on attitudes, work habits and effort. 
    • Include in writing, Ministry-approved performance indicators as set out in the Provincial Letter Grades Order to indicate the student’s level of performance as it relates to the expected learning standards for each subject and grade. 
  • 1.3.3 Secondary Reports (Grades 9,10, 11 and 12)
    • Provide Ministry-approved letter grades as set out in the Provincial Letter Grades Order to indicate the student’s level of performance as it relates to the expected learning standards for each course or subject and grade. 
    • Include percentages for courses numbered 9, 10, 11 and 12 only; each of the courses numbered 9, 10, 11 and 12 must receive percentages. 
    • Include written comments, where appropriate, that describe, in relation to the expected learning standards set out in the curriculum: what the student is able to do, areas in which the student requires further attention or development, and ways of supporting the student in his or her learning. 
    • Include written comments to describe student behavior, including information on attitudes, work habits and effort. 

1.4 Report Contents

1.4.1 (Grades 9-12) Teachers must assign and record the approved letter grades as set out in the Provincial Letter Grades Order

A: The student demonstrates excellent or outstanding performance in relation to expected learning standards for the course or subject and grade. 

B: The student demonstrates very good performance in relation to expected learning standards for the course or subject and grade. 

C+: The student demonstrates good performance in relation to expected learning standards for the course or subject and grade. 

C: The student demonstrates satisfactory performance in relation to expected learning standards for the course or subject and grade. 

C-: The student demonstrates minimally acceptable performance in relation to expected learning standards for the course or subject and grade. 

F: (Failed or Failing) The student has not demonstrated, or is not demonstrating, the minimally acceptable performance in relation to the expected learning standards for the course or subject and grade. 

W: (Withdrawal) According to the Ministry Guidelines for Student Reporting for The Kindergarten to Grade 12 Education Plan, and upon request of the parent of the student or, when appropriate, the student, the administrative officer in charge of a school may grant permission for a student to withdraw from a course or subject. 

X: (In Progress or Incomplete) The reporting symbol “I” is to be used in accordance with the following guidelines (note: underlined sections indicate action beyond that required by the Ministry) 

1.4.2 Using the “I” reporting symbol:

  • 1.4.2.1 The purpose of the symbol is to alert parents, as soon as problems are detected, that the student is not demonstrating minimally acceptable performance in relation to the expected learning standards; 
  • 1.4.2.2 The symbol may be given for a variety of reasons; examples include: the student may be making progress but requires additional time and/or support, the student has not completed important assignments rendering the teacher unable to adequately assess progress, the student has not been attending class; 
  • 1.4.2.3 The symbol may be used at any time during the school year, including on formal reports; with the exception of the final report. 
  • 1.4.2.4 An “F” letter grade can only be assigned if an “I” reporting symbol has been previously assigned in the same term 
  • 1.4.2.5 The regulations surrounding the “I” reporting symbol are mandated in grades 4 through 12.

1.4.3 When an “I” reporting symbol has been assigned:

  • 1.4.3.1 students and parents must be informed and must be provided with an opportunity to consult with the teacher about the problem the student is having and possible solutions;
  • 1.4.3.2 teachers must be prepared to identify what the problem is;
  • 1.4.3.3 teachers must be prepared to specify a plan of action that is intended to help students achieve the learning standards; NOTE: it is the recommendation of the School District that a date of completion be attached to the plan of action;
  • 1.4.3.4 the plan of action must be communicated to the parents and the student; the Ministry suggests that it may be communicated through a written plan, verbally by telephone, or in a direct meeting.; NOTE: it is the strong recommendation of the school district that all verbal communications be recorded in writing and that a copy be sent to the parents and another copy be included in the General Student Record File (G4)

1.4.4 The “I” symbol must be converted to another letter grade: 

  • 1.4.4.1 before a student’s records are transferred to another school unless there is agreement between the principals of the two schools to defer conversion;  
  • 1.4.4.2 when letter grades are recorded on the permanent student record card; 
  • 1.4.4.3 it is the recommendation of the School District that the “I” reporting symbol be converted to another letter grade or performance indicator on the date of completion of the plan of action; 
  • 1.4.4.4 before submission of Grade 11 and 12 marks to the Ministry.  

(NOTE: See sample action plan to accompany the reporting symbol “I” AP 303-1 Action Plan for ‘I’ Letter Grade

1.5 Informal Reports may be either written or verbal, and must be documented as to date, type (letter, phone call, etc.) and content.

1.5.1 Students who are not demonstrating a minimally acceptable performance in relation to the expected learning standards must receive an informal report to that effect before being given a failing grade (F) on a formal report. 

1.5.2 In relation to curriculum, informal reports may describe: what the student is able to do, the areas of learning that require further attention or development, and ways the teacher is supporting the student’s learning needs (and, where appropriate, ways the student or the parents might support the learning). 

1.5.3 Informal reports provide an important link between home and school and can be accomplished in a variety of ways, such as: telephone calls, interim reports (written or oral), and conferences (parent-teacher, three-way, student-led, etc.) 

1.5.4 Parent interviews with formal reporting are not to be considered informal reports. A record of each informal report noting the date of report, type of report and topic(s) of discussion must be kept and included within the Student General Record file. In accordance with district policy, students must receive an informal report indicating that they are not demonstrating a minimally acceptable performance in relation to the learning standards before being given a failing grade (F) on a formal report. 

1.6 Final Reports are one of the three required formal reports, included in the Student General Record file, completed according to the guidelines above, with the addition of a “Placement for September” statement. (Given that the comments within the report clearly follow Ministry requirements, the “Placement for September” statement should simply contain the grade level, e.g., “Placement for September: Grade 4”.) 

1.6.1 The following are used in addition to the approved letter grades on final reports for students in grades 4 through 12. ​

SG: (Standing Granted) Although completion of normal requirement is not possible, a sufficient level of performance has been attained to warrant, consistent with the best interests of the student, the granting of standing for the course or subject and grade. Standing Granted may be used in cases of serious illness, hospitalization, late entry or early leaving, but may only be granted by an adjudication process authorized by the administrative officer in charge of the school. 

TS: (Transfer Standing) May be granted by the administrative officer in charge of a school on the basis of an examination of records from an institution other than a school as defined in the School Act. Alternatively, the administrative officer in charge of a school may assign a letter grade on the basis of an examination of those records. 

F: (Failed) may only be used as a final grade if an I (Incomplete or In Progress) grade has been previously assigned and a plan of assistance has been completed, or if the student is in the final year of an educational program. 

1.6.2 In Grades 9, 10, 11 and 12, both the percentage and the appropriate letter grade (as per the following table) shall be shown on the report card. 
A: 86-100% 
B: 73-85% 
C+: 67-72% 
C: 60-66% 
C-: 50-59% 

1.6.3 The successful completion of a course numbered 9, 10, 11 or 12 requires a minimum of a C-grade. 

2. Student with Special Needs

2.1 Students with a designated as special needs will receive letter grades only in those courses where they are capable of meeting curricular standards. Their reports will take the form of structured written comments in reference to the outcomes stated in their Individual Education Plans (IEP).

3. English Language Learners

3.1 For those students who are incapable of meeting curricular standards due to a language barrier, the report card will take the form of structured written comments based on that student’s Annual Education Plan (AEP). Letter grades need not be given. However, letter grades may be given for subjects in which the student is capable of meeting the standards.

4. Responsibility for Procedures - Procedures related to this policy may be changed with the approval of the Superintendent of Schools.

4.1 A principal may seek exemption from these guidelines through formal written request to the Superintendent of Schools. Such exemptions will be granted based on the following criteria:
• The proposed practices are research-based
• The group of teachers have ben appropriately consulted and are in full support of the practice
• The parent community, through the SPC, has been fully consulted and there is general support for exemption.

Appendix


AP 303-1 Action Plan for 'I' Letter Grade

Reference


AP 112 – Student Data – Storage and Retrieval

Reporting Student Progress Policy and Practice

(Last Revised: June 2019)

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Reporting (Report Card)

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